Lower Back Pain When Standing: What Causes It?

There it goes again. That aching sensation that begins in your lower back and spreads into your shoulders and hips.

Chances are, you’ve experienced some form of lower back pain when standing. The WHO estimates between 60 and 70 percent of adults will experience lower back pain in their lifetime.

But once you’ve calmed that pain down by sitting or stretching it’s time to understand the causes of back pain while standing. And to see if it’s time to find a doctor that can help.

Lower Back Pain When Standing: Work Injuries

The most common causes of back pain are stress when lifting objects. Or the continual stress of standing in one place while working in a retail or manufacturing job.

The repetitive motion of continually moving even light objects can also cause back injury even when the work is done.

Even inactivity like sitting at your desk all day can lead to back strain, especially once you begin to stand up or walk around again. Over time this pain can get worse and lead to a serious injury.

Luckily, this type of back pain is often treatable by resting and learning lifting techniques to reduce symptoms and stop further damage.

Lower Back Pain When Standing: Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Lower back pain doesn’t only come from injuries though. Several underlying conditions can also cause continual pain.

If you are 50 or older a likely culprit may be lumbar spinal stenosis or narrowing of the spine.

Spinal stenosis most often occurs in the lumbar, or lower part, of the spine where it can lead to back pain while standing or walking. Other symptoms may include weakened legs, numbness in the lower back or hips, and sharp pain radiating down the leg.

Severe stenosis could also lead to bladder or bowel problems.

There are several nonsurgical treatments that can ease this pain including physical therapy, steroid injections or chiropractic treatment.

Lower Back Pain When Standing: Ruptured Disc

A common cause of lower back pain is damage to the squishy structures (discs) that separate your spinal column.

Damage to these discs can happen during daily life or repetitive work injuries. A disc may swell or slip, putting pressure on the nerves that run along your spine.

Almost everyone will suffer from a ruptured disc at some time in their life, though they may not have severe symptoms.

In most cases, the pain will go away as soon as the body has a chance to repair itself. Usually in a matter of a couple days or weeks. But, if your legs become weak or if you have bladder or bowel issues – it’s time to seek a doctor.

Lower Back Pain When Standing: Seeking Help

If you’ve got constant lower back pain when standing it is likely all you think about. But relief is usually only a phone call away.

If the injury occurred while you are on the job, that treatment is likely covered by your employer’s Workers Compensation plan. However, it’s important to find an experienced workers’ comp doctor near you to get the best help possible before more damage is done.

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